Archives For video

10 years ago, non-profit videos were different. They were on brand, on message, had voice-over narration and showed children suffering terribly. It turns out, people don’t especially seek out this content to watch (although arguably still effective in fundraising with older demographics).

With the rise of online video, there’s been a trend in the industry to create art, or entertainment that people want to watch.

After looking at 2012′s top non-profit videos (mainly 1M+ views) nearly all are one of the following:

  • Funny
  • Shocking
  • Sexy
  • Amazing/Beautiful

Here’s ten that we thought made the biggest waves in 2012.

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10. Sorry, we’re going to need that back…
Organisation: GetUp
Views: 70,000 (in 2 weeks)

GetUp is an Aussie group that knows video. In 2011 they created “It’s Time” a simple concept with a brilliant ending that racked up 7 million views. They’re masters at reframing issues to make people think. In this video GetUp imagines how the government’s decision to divert aid might play out in office. It’s sad, funny, and convincing.

The team at GetUp raised $100k from this video.

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9. How to Grow a Moustache with Nick Offerman
Organisation: ManMade.com for Movember
Views: 1,040,508

To promote Movember, ManMade went manly. Actor Nick Offerman teaches the ways of the ‘stach, and eats a raw onion. It’s a style reminiscent Will Ferrel in Anchorman, Old Spice, and Dollar Shave Club.

Movember raises money to fight prostate cancer. You’ll notice this video doesn’t focus on–or even mention–the cause. It’s a trend becoming more common in cause related marketing. If you want to read more there’s a link, but Nick doesn’t smash you for your money.

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8. Boyfriend Went Vegan (Semi-NSFW)
Organisation: People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
Views: 3,009,700

Last night, this got boo’d. Fair enough. I

In true PETA fashion the ad is controversial. The intended message here is “Men: if you go vegan, you’ll be better in bed”, opposite to those that equate veganism with being unmanly.

Some feel that the ad implies violence against women. Two thirds of YouTube ratings are thumbs down, and facebook social plugin shows around 75% of comments are negative sentiment.

Despite the complaints, their core demographic must be responding because year after year they continue to create provocative media like this. And they get attention.

PETA spokesperson: “The piece is tongue-in-cheek. People who watch the ad all the way through see the woman has a mischievous smile. She’s happy to go back with him. It’s playful.”

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7. Africa for Norway
Organisation: The Norwegian Students’ and Academics’ International Assistance Fund
Views: 2,052,615

This won last night’s “People’s Choice – Comedy” award.

Inspired by the 1980′s “We are the World” and “Do they know it’s Christmas?” Africa for Norway shows a western audience exactly how silly some good intentioned aid ideas are.
Beginning with a hilarious intro from celebrity rapper Breezy (remember 50 cent’s “global movement’?) the video carries the fake appeal through the very end, and onto the website. The campaign goals are listed there, but I can’t help but wish there was an opportunity for supporters to take meaningful action beyond the joke…

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6. Dumb Ways to Die
Organisation: Metro Trains
Views: 38,731,272

Does Metro Trains qualify as a non-profit? This one is too good to keep off the list on a technicality!

Last night’s Melbourne audience was especially familiar with this cause marketing campaign. It’s a morbidly cute, catchy tune that rose to 6th most downloaded song on iTunes (globally). Creatives behind the campaign said kids are more concerned about not being seen as dumb by peers than dying, thus the chorus.

It’s a full 2:21 into the video before safety around trains is even mentioned.

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5. Girls Going Wild in Red Light District (Semi-NSFW)
Organisation: Listed at the end of video, I won’t ruin the surprise.
Views: 3,217,953

Here’s another video that waits to reveal it’s deeper message. After dancing along with the crowd, you’ll feel like you got punched in the face at the end.

The experiential marketing blends a real life campaign with online reach, just like the next one…

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4. Smoking Kid
Organisation: Thai Health Promotion Foundation
Views: 1,002,312

“Smoking Kid” and “Girls Going Wild in Red Light District” both have the benefit of organic search—people stumbling on it looking for something else. This one gets a traffic boost from the 2010 news clip of a child who smokes a pack a day (17M views).

When smokers are lecturing others about the dangers of smoking, you’re doing it right.

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3. Kony 2012
Organisation: Invisible Children
Views: 110,000,000

Clearly, a few people have already expressed their thoughts about this video. Some remember Kony as the biggest trainwreck of 2012; for others it’s the pinnacle of digital video storytelling.

While it may have simplified the plot, advocated military intervention, and came from a western lens, it certainly got people to listen and take action. My feeling is that the charity world only took the warnings, and none of the lessons.

Tell a story.
Make it personal.
Make it beautiful.
Know your audience.
Aim bigger.
Target influencers.
Invest in video.

Here’s something you might not know: Invisible made $12.6 million (net) from the campaign. That’s more than any single year income for the organisation.

Invisible did make Kony famous. Perhaps the guys will tackle climate change next?

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2. First World Problems Anthem
Organisation: Water is Life
Views: 2,073,640

“When I go to the bathroom and forget my phone.”
“When I tell them no pickles, and

Priceless.

This video piggybacked off the popular twitter hashtag–but flipped the context. It’s funny, relatable, and hits hard. The video finishes with short simple ask. Here’s the top-ranked comments:

#firstworldproblems

Water is Life created a few bonus videos that respond directly to specific people tweeting #firstworldproblems. View here, here, and here.

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1. Rachel Beckwith’s Mom visits Ethiopia
Organisation: charity: water
Views: 600,000

This might restore your faith in humanity.

It’s the most emotional video of the bunch, and on Thursday at #net2melb, many of us were in tears. Charity: water have put out over 200 videos… this is the best I’ve seen yet. It’s different from the other concept pieces created by agencies; it’s slower, beautiful, and moving. In light of Rachel’s death, and the subsequent outpouring of support, I feel equal parts devastating sadness and joy.

Charity: water have done an amazing job communicating their mission. They explained it clear enough for a child to understand, and want to help. They built an online fund-raising platform that works easy enough for Rachel to start her campaign. And in honour of Rachel, they shared her story, made the media, and raised $1.2M. Now they’re showing the impact and saying thank you to donors.

It’s an amazing story. Kudos to Rachel’s mom for sharing, and to @jazzyjamieleigh for her beautiful work filming and editing on deadline.

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Honorable Mentions:

Final Thoughts

Are you surprised the big orgs aren’t in there? Don’t be. Creating a video with viral appeal is nearly the opposite of the way many established organisation operate: it takes risk, buy-in, and requires more attention to the audience than internal politics. Young, scrappy orgs with a clear identity lead the charge in digital video, while established organisations are sticking to what has safely worked in the past, like grants and direct marketing.

Will your organsation make a viral video? Statistically speaking, it’s unlikely. But if you’re authentic, concise, and focus on your audience, you’ve got a better shot than the others.

What do you think? What charity videos do you remember from 2012?

Comment below or share this post for a chance to win Seth Godin’s newest book “The Icarus Deception”, a book about risk, beauty and passion. One winner randomly chosen, shipped anywhere in the world. 

Creative Fridays

kyle —  07/27/2012 — 1 Comment

"do a lot of work" ira glass

Master storyteller Ira Glass gives this advice to creatives:

“Do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that your will be as good as your ambition”

Today is my first week of a 4-day work week! I’m talkingt Fridays off to (hopefully) do a lot of creative work. I’ve never worked on a documentary, I’ve always wanted to, so what better time than now?

Big thanks to work for the flexibility, and to my wife, friends, family (and commenters) for the encouragement to be risky, chase dreams, and tell stories. And thanks Mr. Ira Glass, for this:

 

Earlier this month, I had the privilege of filming at CBM’s partner organisation, CCBRT in Tanzania, and community based organisations and clinics in Kenya. I was fortunate to work with Greg Low, a veteran documentary producer, and learned a ton from him. We met individuals living with–or caring for children with–disability. It was humbling, powerful and inspiring.

For me, making videos has always invoked equal parts excitement and fear. I’m often overwhelmed with the tremendous responsibility it is to share stories from the field with our donors. Sometimes it’s a good overwhelmed: it keeps me honest, focused, and aware of my role. Other times, it’s simply overwhelming and I become frozen or fearful. I’m usually nervous to review the footage and start editing, for fear that I won’t be able to relay the story as compellingly or as powerful as I first heard it. I’m learning to work within the tension.

In the spirit of inspiration and sharing, here’s five videos from producers I admire. I love the style (most are shot on Canon DSLR’s) and the way the stories are told. I’m keen to hear what others think.

Title: Radar Development People with Disabilities
Organisation: CCBRT

 

Title: Voices for Change, Delhi
Organisation: Greenpeace
Produced by Philip Bloom

Title: 37 Scars
Organisation: World Vision USA
Produced by Josh Batchelder

Title: Clean Water for the Bayaka
Organisation: charity: water

Title: Baby Heart
Produced by Ricky Norris, Discover The Journey

How should your non-profit share video online? There’s no shortage of options. Brightcove, YouTube, Vimeo, Kewego, SeeToo, Akami, and so on.

Most media websites, like the NYTimes or TV channels, have their own custom video players. This is so they can earn ad revenue, or exclusively show their content in the context of their website. As a NGO, your goals look different. Whether you’re advocating, informing or motivating, the point of your non-profit video is for people to see it, not to make ad revenue. Here’s 10 reasons why I think your org should go with YouTube.

1. Get the most views
Hosting and embedding on YouTube practically guarantee the highest amount of views. YouTube has the best sharing rate and best embedding rate (probably because people are already familiar to the user experience). Additionally:

  • YouTube auto populates embeds links in twitter, Facebook, gmail, and heaps of other social sites.
  • YouTube allows viewers to subscribe to your video uploads, and pushes them notifications.
  • YouTube works on nearly all mobile phones, ipads, web browsers and other platforms.

Think back. When’s the last time someone sent you an email to check out a video that was buried in a site, and hosted on a 3rd party platform?

To be honest, the odds are already against your video “going viral”. If you don’t host via YouTube, your chances become almost laughable.

2. Technology
3d, 4k, HTML5, mobile-ready, social embedding… head spinning yet? You want to choose a video platform that is going to change as quickly as the web technology that delivers it. Brightcove is famously behind, Vimeo is quickly improving, but for implementing the latest technology, my money is on YouTube. And so is Google’s (Google purchased YouTube in 2004).

3. Search
YouTube is the second highest search engine. Not hosting your videos on YouTube is the SEO equivalent of not letting Google index your website. But it’s not just hosting. YouTube/Google give preference in search results to videos with higher view counts. In plain english: it’s not enough to just upload a copy of your video to YouTube and host via something else. You’ll want your video views to be “counted” for on YouTube, thus increasing your search result rankings, thus increasing your views via the worlds second highest search engine…. you get the picture.

4. Search (Part 2) or The United Airlines Effect
If you’re not the number one video result for your brand, someone else is. This is the number one result for United Airlines.

In the non-profit world, your top search result might be a homemade video from a donor. Chances are, it doesn’t pass branding control. Perhaps they’ve misinterpreted your message, or paternalised your recipients, or worse.

…It’s best for you to own your search results (or at least try).

5. In-video clickable giving
Interactive videos! As long as you’re a registered non-profit, you can add giving links, find our more links, and download our Annual Report links from within your videos. You can also link to other videos, like in these “choose your own adventure” style series. Brilliant!

6. Accessibility
To my knowledge, YouTube is the only video site actively pursing accessibility options. They’re working on auto-captioning, but until it’s perfect, CaptionTube syncs with YouTube to manually create subtitles. Plus, with such a large user base, many people are proactively adding their captions and translations. Online video has still has a way to go to establishing standards for accessibility–expect to see YouTube lead the way.

7. Community
The biggest difference between YouTube and other social video platforms (vimeo, metacafe) is the community. Like facebook and twitter, youtube has a community of users, celebrities and voices who are already popular. Recently, some NGO’s have begun tapping into these vloggers to spread the word about their work.

…If you’re an NGO not using YouTube, you probably won’t have much credibility with the “YouTubers”.

8. Video Quality
If you’re still under the impression that YouTube videos are all fuzzy and pixelated, you’re wrong. In 2009 YouTube announced support for full HD 1920×1080, blu-ray quality video. And in 2010, YouTube announced support for 4k resolution–best viewed on a 25 ft screen.

Think you’ll never need high resolution video? It’s an hour before your annual fundraising gala and you left the DVD at home… no problem if you have the video uploaded in high-def. Preload and stream it fullscreen… no need to tell the boss.

9. Downloads
For registered non-profits YouTube has added optional “download” functionality. For free. Burning and shipping DVD copies will soon (hopefully) become a thing of the past.

10. Faster International Uploading
When uploading videos from rural Tanzania, it’s important to have fast uploads and resumeable uploads (if you lose your connection for a moment, you don’t have to restart the entire process). Plus, YouTube processes video quicker than any other host I’ve worked with, including the expensive platforms.

…And it’s Free
You’re a non-profit. Hosting and serving up videos is expensive. I’ve yet to hear a compelling argument to spend thousands of dollars on what YouTube provides, better, and for free.

What does all that look like in practise? Check out charity:water’s use of youtube embedding here: http://www.charitywater.org/whywater/

Agree? Disagree? Eager to hear your comments below.